Off the Cuff: Seaholm Rover

As we saw in the previous review of the OffShore, Seaholm makes rather well-spec’d watches and their collection covers most needs for tool watch enthusiasts. The OffShore, as its name indicates, is their diver, the Rover is their field watch. The general aesthetic of the two watches is the same, and they virtually have the same specifications, so this section will be short today. What we will focus on, though, is how Seaholm managed to re-interpret what an actual field watch is and how well it should perform in any and all conditions—whether jumping from meeting to meeting, playing with the kids outside, or jumping out of an airplane. The Rover, more than the OffShore, is a do-it-all-tool watch that packs a lot underneath its attractive hood. 

Seaholm Rover Microbrand Watch Review
Seaholm Rover @mainspring.watch

Just like the OffShore, the Rover comes in with a 41mm case, a lug-to-lug distance of 50.5mm, a height of 14.5mm, and a lug width of 21mm. It is powered by the Sellita SW200-1 automatic movement that beats at 28,800 BPH and offers 38 hours of power reserve. The crystal is of the domed sapphire type and has generous layers of anti-reflective coating. The Rover is water resistant to 200 meters (it is ISO 6425 certified) is resistant to magnetism, thanks to its ARMCO iron cage, and is fitted with custom-made shock absorbers. The watch will tick without skipping a beat, even after a 10-foot (3 meters) drop. 

Phew, that was a lot of specifications in one paragraph. 

Seaholm Rover Microbrand Watch Review
Powered by the SW200-1 @mainspring.watch

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Specs

Case316L Stainless Steel
41mm Diameter
50.5mm Lug to Lug
14.5mm Thick
21mm Lug Width
Screwed Crown & Caseback
200m Water Resistance
Dial & CrystalDomed Sapphire /w AR
Brushed Metal Dial
Applied Indices
C3 Super-LumiNova
MovementSellita SW200-1
28 800bph
26 Jewels
38-Hour Power Reserve
Strap316L Stainless Steel Bracelet
/w Solid Links and Diver’s Extension
Nylon NATO

Seaholm Rover


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Of Interest

More than the outstanding technical specifications of this watch, it is what Seaholm achieved by creating this model that is worth lingering over. As we’ve talked about in the review of their OffShore model, the brand went through many hoops to build tough watches. They got things designed for them, outsourced the best materials, and created their own testing procedures to truly push the watches to their limits. Limits that each one of their models successfully reached with flying colors. This almost obsession for building ultra tough watches comes from their intended purpose: life. 

Seaholm Rover Microbrand Watch Review
Built for life @mainspring.watch

Todd, like the people who buy Seaholm watches, is an outdoorsy man who likes to go fly fishing and play outside with his children. His customers are hunters, professional fishermen, hikers, campers, and even musicians who live on the road. These are lifestyles that demand that their watch be well-built and reliable. And most importantly, to be able to get serviced for a reasonable price anywhere in the world. This makes each Seaholm watch have to check many boxes and I’d argue that they do indeed check all of these boxes. 

Seaholm Rover Microbrand Watch Review
200m water resistance @mainspring.watch

In the past two years I’ve had the opportunity to spend several months with Seaholm watches and they remain my favorite tool watches. I’ve handled dozens and dozens of watches thus far and both the OffShore and the Rover are watches that I did not fear camping with, diving with, playing with my dogs, and taking hiking in the blazing heat of Death Valley. We even dove to 20 meters in the Mediterranean Sea. My point here is to say that Seaholm actually makes watches for adventurous people and this comes with a certain price tag: around $2,000 for either the OffShore or the Rover we are looking at here. 

Seaholm Rover Microbrand Watch Review
Equipped with ARMCO iron cage and shock absorbers @mainspring.watch

Quibbles

If I were to have to quibble about something that would be the watch’s dimensions. Although they are not enormous by any stretch, they do lean on the larger and heavier side, making Seaholm watches more wearable for people who have medium to large wrists. Having 6.25” (16.5 cm) wrists, the Rover feels a tad too big and heavy for long-term wear for me. Luckily, Seaholm also sells NATO straps and one can choose to have the Rover on either a bracelet or a strap. The latter reduces the overall weight of the watch and makes it more wearable and more comfortable for the long run. 

Seaholm Rover Microbrand Watch Review
Classic field watch design @mainspring.watch

There is a quibble that some may have with the overall design of the watch which I thought I should mention here. 

The 3-6-9 dial layout is not original and neither it is new. Some might wish that Seaholm would have gone for something different, a bit more original. And I tend to agree with those who would think that. I have the same quibble with numerous microbrands that have used the 3-6-9 Explorer-type dial for their field watches. However, the fact that it is a popular dial layout means it’s effective and timeless. And I think that’s what Seaholm tried to achieve here: they created the watch from the “design follows function” perspective and their priority was to make the watch legible and reliable. 

Seaholm Rover Microbrand Watch Review
7x the current ISO standard for anti-magnetism @mainspring.watch

Final Thoughts

Seaholm is without any doubt a brand that makes watches that can be worn outdoors, worry-free. Todd, the company’s founder, mentioned that he wishes for people to see a Seaholm watch the same way people saw the first Rolex Submariners when they came out in the 50s: as a solid piece of horology that is relatively attainable and is resolutely dependable and serviceable. All of these traits are what made tool watches popular back then and that continue to make them popular today. Although $2,000 is a lot of money to spend on a watch, rest assured they would be well-spent on a Seaholm. Maybe the Rover will not be your first tool watch, but it could very well be your second and last one. 

The Seaholm Offshore retails for $1895USD. For more information, check out the brand website.

Seaholm Rover Microbrand Watch Review
Seaholm Rover @mainspring.watch

Vincent Deschamps is a museum professional, originally from France, with more than 10 years experience as a researcher, producing visitor experiences for national and international organizations. He is also the founder of mainspring.watch. You can follow Vincent on Instagram.


Off The Cuff articles are full-length, hands-on reviews of the watch in question and represent the opinion of the author only. All photos are original, unless specified otherwise. If you would like to have your watch reviewed on this site, contact us here.

Please understand that using any links to products on this site might result in us making money.

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